Waterproof Cruises

Ross Sea Expedition Cruise

Discover one of the most remote corners of our planet during an expedition cruise to the ice-packed Ross Sea.

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Ross Sea Expedition Cruise

The Ross Sea is a unique place on earth that is sealed off from the outside world by impenetrable pack ice for at least 8 months of the year. The most southernly sea on earth is largely covered by an immense layer of ice, several hundred metres thick and rising 15 to 50 metres above the water surface. This 'Ross Ice shelf' literally forms a wall of ice that completely seals off the southern part of the sea. This is where the enormous tabular icebergs are formed, which we will undoubtedly encounter on our expedition cruise to the Ross Sea.
The Ross Sea is home to a wide range of Antarctic polar animals, including the illustrious Emperor penguins, the largest of its kind. Furthermore, many seals, whales and orcas can be spotted here in between the icebergs and the floating sea ice.

The Ross Sea owes its name to the person who discovered it in 1841: Sir James Clark Ross. The British Royal Geographical Society chose the Ross Sea for the famous British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904 led by Robert Falcon Scott. This expedition was the start of what is now called the 'Race to the Pole'. Scott hoped to win this race to the South Pole but was defeated in 1911 by his rival, the Norwegian Roald Amundsen. Many remains of this time, including the cabin of famous historical explorer Shackleton, have been preserved and can still be visited. The dramatic landscape described by these explorers is largely unchanged and just as inspiring today as it was 100 years ago.

Because there are many routes to the Ross sea and plenty beautiful places to experience there, we listed some of the places you might visit on your journey. Unfortunately we can't give any guarantees because of the ice and weather conditions that can change at any time, but we do everything we can to create a successful trip for you.

  • The Ross Ice Shelf

    The Bay of Whales is part of the Ross Ice Shelf, the largest ice shelf in the world, and is constantly changing with the receding ice masses. Large icebergs are present here, along with great wildlife opportunities. This masive chunk of ice is formed by natures elements and has a smooth surface, ridged edges with caves, deep caverns, ledges, bays and promontories in infinite shades of blue.

  • Ross Island

    Ross Island was the base for many of the early expeditions to Antarctica. It is the southernmost island reachable by sea. On Ross island you can see Mount Erebus, Mount Terror, and Mount Byrd, as well as many other famous historical spots that played an important role in the British expeditions of the last century: Cape Royds, where Ernest Shackleton’s cabin still stands; Cape Evans, where the cabin of Robert Falcon Scott can still be seen; and Hut Point, from which Scott and his men set out for the South Pole. The American scientific base of McMurdo Station and New Zealand’s Scott Base is also located on the island and is a possible visiting place.

  • Cape Adare

    We try to have a landing at Cape Adare, where for the first time humans wintered on the Antarctic Continent. The Norwegian Borchgrevink stayed here in 1899, taking shelter in a hut that to this day is surrounded by the largest colony of Adélie penguins in the world. Curious penguins often come very close, offering superb photographic opportunities.

  • Peter I Island

    Almost completely covered by ice, this volcanic island which highest peak reaches 1640 metres, is surrounded by pack ice and ice cliffs some 40 metres tall, making any approach difficult. Peter I Island was discovered by Fabian von Bellingshausen in 1821 and named after Peter the Great of Russia. It is considered one of the most remote islands in the world and rarely visited by passenger vessels due to the extreme nature and weather conditions in this area.

  • Enderby Island

    Enderby Island is on of the Auckland Islands and part of New Zealand's sub-Antarctic region. It's the perfect place for birding as you can spot a large variety of sea birds here, including white-capped albatrosses and Buller’s albatrosses. Furthermore, Enderby Island might be the place where you'll see Auckland teals, yellow-eyed penguins and maybe even the rare Auckland shags which are endemic to the island.

  • Campbell Islands

    Campbell Islands, the most southerly of the New Zealand Sub-Antarctic Islands, lie on the Campbell Plateau - a submerged part of the New Zealand mainland. The fauna and blooming vegetation on the Campbell Islands are an amazing highlight, with a large and easily accessible colony of southern royal albatrosses on the main island. On the neighbouring satellite islands we can find various pecies of albatrosses such as grey-headed, black-browed, and light-mantled ones. There are also several breeding penguin species present, the eastern rockhopper, erect-crested, and yellow-eyed penguins. In the 18th century, seals in the area were hunted to extinction, but the elephant seals, fur seals, and sea lions have since returned.

  • Macquarie Island

    A rocky island covered in grasses and low herbs, with patches of free water. You can photograph and observe the hundreds of Southern Elephant Seals that lay along the beaches. Discover the four species of penguins that breed here; King, Royal, Rockhopper and Gentoo. These brave little inhabitants show no fear of their strange visitors, and next to them you'll find different kinds of sea birds.

  • Shackleton's Cabin

    Shackleton’s Hut was built on Cape Royds, a volcanic headland that forms the western part of Ross Island. A scenic polar panorama surrounds the hut wich shows the mountains and glaciers on the snow covered island. The interior of the Shackleton Hut is simply a museum in itself, fully equipped with its original provisions, furniture, and cooking stove. The jackets and laundry of Shackleton and his men are even still hanging on hooks, as though they’d only recently been placed there. The prefabricated Hut they brought from London was build on February 6, 1908. This would become known as Shackleton’s Hut. Shackleton described the hut as “not a very spacious dwelling for the accommodation of fifteen persons, but our narrow quarters were warmer than if the hut had been larger.” Not surprisingly, warmth was more valuable than space during the cruel Antarctic winter. Step inside the Hut and experience what life was like during an expedition from Shackelton.

Dates & Rates

  • Spirit of Enderby Ross Sea

    Dates
    • 13th Jan - 11th Feb 2021
    • Embark: Port of Bluff
    • Disembark: Invercargill / Christchurch
    Prices from
    Suite
    USD 32,000
    Mini Suite
    USD 29,400
    Superior Plus
    USD 28,300
    Superior
    USD 25,000
    Main deck
    USD 23,000
    Main Deck Triple
    POA
  • Spirit of Enderby Ross Sea

    Dates
    • 11th Feb - 12th Mar 2021
    • Embark: Port of Bluff
    • Disembark: Invercargill / Christchurch
    Prices from
    Suite
    USD 32,000
    Mini Suite
    USD 29,400
    Superior Plus
    USD 28,300
    Superior
    USD 25,000
    Main deck
    USD 23,000
    Main Deck Triple
    POA
  • Le Commandant-Charcot Ross Sea

    Dates
    • 15th Feb - 12th Mar 2022
    • Embark: Ushuaia
    • Disembark: Ushuaia
    Prices from
    Owner's Suite
    EUR 105,850
    Duplex Suite
    EUR 92,410
    Privilege Suite
    EUR 65,530
    Prestige Suite
    EUR 60,490
    Privilege Cabin
    EUR 43,690
    Prestige Cabin
    EUR 35,290

    Including: Overnight in Santiago + flights Santiago/Ushuaia
    Up to 25% Early Booking Discount!

Extensions

Call us today on +31 (0) 858 771 583